Levels

What is your ski, snowboard or mountain bike technique, condition and knowledge level?

We have divided levels into five parts. With every program, winter and summer, we expect a minimum level. View the level descriptions for skiing, snowboarding and mountain biking below.

Ski & Snowboard Levels

Usually there are several groups for a trip or training, these are classified by us on the basis of level and wishes. The minimum level required to participate varies per trip. For example, at our off-piste training Descend Technique and Descend Condition are the most important because we use elevators there. Groups are made for these training courses for all levels, Rookie to Expert. Are you coming ski touring or split boarding , then we expect that you are already at Beginner or Intermediate level in terms of descending, but Ascending Technique and Condition is also important. Curious about your level and which skills you can still develop?

descent technique

1. Rookie: You ski or snowboard stably with tempo control and in medium turns of red and black slopes. With good visibility, you can make short descents in clear terrain with soft snow.

2. Beginner: You ski or snowboard stably with tempo control and in medium turns on all types of slopes and ski routes up to 30 degrees. With good visibility, you can make short descents in clear terrain with soft or tracked snow. A short traverse (snowboarders) is no problem.

3. Intermediate: You ski or snowboard stably with tempo control, in medium and short turns on all types of off-piste descents up to 35 degrees. With good but also with reduced visibility you can make medium-long descents through partly obscure terrain and through hard tracked snow.

4. Advanced: You ski or snowboard stably with tempo control, in medium and short turns on all types of slopes and off-piste descents. With poor visibility, you can make long descents in unclear terrain with narrow passages and couloirs of up to 40 degrees. You can descend through a dense forest, between rocks or in bruchharsch.

5. Expert: You ski or snowboard stably with tempo control, in long, medium and short turns on all types of slopes and off-piste descents in any steepness. With poor visibility you make long descents in unclear terrain with narrow passages and couloirs. You can descend in any steepness through a dense forest, between rocks or in bruchharsch.


descent condition

1. Rookie: You have sufficient condition to descend a red or black slope in medium turns in one go. After a few descents through the soft snow next to the piste, you notice that you are getting tired. This tastes like more.

2. Beginner: You have sufficient condition to descend in medium turns, all slopes and ski routes with a steepness of up to 30 degrees. One morning or several mornings, short descents through the soft snow are tiring but no problem.

3. intermediate: You have sufficient condition to descend in short turns, all types of slopes and off-piste descents, in medium lengths with a steepness of up to 35 degrees. Making descents through the hard or heavy snow for a whole day is no problem. You can recharge yourself for another day like this.

4. Advanced: You have sufficient condition to descend in short turns, all types of slopes and off-piste descents, in long stretches with a steepness of up to 40 degrees. Making descents for several days through the hard, heavy snow or on ice is no problem. At the end of the day you can still give gas.

5. Expert: You have sufficient condition to descend in long, medium and short turns on all types of slopes and off-piste descents in any steepness. Making descents for a whole week, full days through the hard, heavy snow or on ice is no problem. You are indestructible.


Ascent technique

1. Rookie: You’ve never toured or split.

2. Beginner: You have little experience on touring skis or a splitboard, but you have not yet had any training on the basic technique of touring, spitzkehren and conversion. The terrain in which you make a tour is clear and there is no risk in the event of a fall. On a surface with soft snow and up to a steepness of 30 degrees (without spitzkehren) you come up stable.

3. Intermediate: You have little experience on touring skis or a splitboard and have had training in the basic technique of touring, spitzkehren and conversion. The terrain in which you make a tour is open, partly obscure, but there is no risk in the event of a fall. On a hard surface and up to a steepness of 35 degrees you will reach the top in a stable manner with, among other things, spitzekehren.

4. Advanced: You are experienced and trained on touring skis or a splitboard in boatpacking, spitzkehren on resin irons in steep terrain or descending in a rope group on the glacier. The terrain in which you take a tour is partly narrow (couloir), unclear and there is a risk in some parts of a fall. On a hard and icy surface up to a steepness of 40 degrees, you come up stable.

5. Expert: You are very experienced and well trained on touring skis or a splitboard in, among other things, bootpacking on crampons, spitzkehren on resin irons in steep terrain, using a pickel or descending in a rope group on the glacier. The terrain in which you make a tour is narrow (couloir), unclear and there is a risk in the event of a fall. On every surface and steepness you come up stably.


Ascent condition

1. Rookie: You have sufficient condition for a short climb or tour with a light backpack. For example, a boat pack up to 100 meters (hm) or a tour up to 500 meters. In open and not too steep terrain you are moving for 30 minutes to 1.5 hours. You can compare this to a 5 km run in the forest or a 25 km ride on a mountain bike.

2. Beginner: You are in sufficient condition to ascend for half a day or several half days with a light backpack. For example, a boat pack up to 200 hm or a tour up to 1000 hm. In open terrain up to a steepness of 30 degrees, you are moving for 1 hour to 3.5 hours. You can compare this to a 10 km run in the forest or a 40 km ride on a mountain bike.

3. intermediate: You are in sufficient condition to make day trips or crossings with a heavy backpack (15 kg). For example, a short boat pack up to 300 hm or a tour up to 1500 hm. In open terrain with narrow passages up to a steepness of 35 degrees, you are moving for 2 to 5 hours. You can compare this to a 20 km run in the forest or a 65 km ride on a mountain bike.

4. Advanced: You are in sufficient condition to make multi-day trips or crossings with a heavy backpack (15 kg). For example, a boat pack up to 400 hm or a tour up to 2000 hm. In terrain with narrow passages and/or a couloir up to a steepness of 40 degrees, you will be moving for 3 to 6 hours. You can compare this to running a marathon or several days on a mountain bike through the mountains with 1500-2000 hm ascent per day.

5. Expert: You are in sufficient condition to make trips or crossings for a week with a heavy backpack (15 kg). For example, a boat pack of more than 500 hm or a tour up to 2500 hm. In every type of terrain and in every steepness, you will be ascending for 4 to 7 hours. You can keep this up for a week. You can compare this with riding a mountain bike or racing bike for a week through the mountains with 2000-2500 hm ascent per day.


Knowledge

1. Rookie: You may know some terms from the avalanche report, but you have not yet taken an avalanche course. You attended a lecture on avalanches. For example from a guide, a ski school or the Snow Safety Center .

2. Beginner: You understand the terms and information in the avalanche report. You can determine the steepness of a slope (both on a map and on the mountain itself) and perform an avalanche rescue using beeper, shovel and probe. You have extensive theoretical knowledge. For example, you have theory Avalanche I from the Snow Safety Center or the wePowder Safety Academy followed. Possibly you have a Pieperfest attended.

3. Intermediate: You can plan a tour using slope orientations, altimeters, and a decision method such as the Stop or Go or Snowcard. You can perform an avalanche rescue involving multiple victims (multi burials). You have completed the Snow Safety Module of the Snow Safety Center or a comparable course. For example, the Alpinkurs of the Austrian ski and snowboard instructor training.

4. Advanced: You can navigate independently, make decisions and choose a comfortable track in the ascent and descent. You can apply Munter’s reduction method in practice. You have completed Avalanche II theory and practice from the Snow Safety Center or a comparable course.

5. Expert: You can estimate the avalanche danger without using an avalanche report. You can lead (day) trips, have expertise in first aid, group dynamics and complex rescues. You master basic alpine techniques with rope, crampons and pickel. You have completed Avalanche III from the Snow Safety Center or a comparable course. In addition, you have followed the high mountain course (SSC) or a comparable course with alpine (rope) techniques.


Mountain bike levels

For a mountain bike trip or training, we ask for a minimum level, in terms of fitness and technique. For example at a cross country During your trip, your condition is important to be able to handle the long day trips. At a trail During the trip we take the elevator to get to the top and your descending skills are especially important to be able to handle the technical trails. For a enduro During the journey, both ascent and descent technique are important. Curious about your level and where you can still develop?

descent technique

1. Rookie: You drive at a low speed on gravel paths, country roads, cart paths (double trails) and simple single trails. These paths or trails have a difficulty level of S0 and are very wide (120 cm) and well-arranged. There are no obstacles.

2. Beginner: You drive at a low to medium speed on cart paths (double trails) and single trails. These trails, with a difficulty level S1-S2, are wide (90 cm) and well-arranged. The trails have natural obstacles such as small drops-offs and trail obstacles such as floaters, a-frames and bridges. Some parts you have to walk.

3. Intermediate: You ride at an average speed on single trails and rock gardens. These trails with a difficulty level S2-S3 are on average wide (60 cm) and partly clear. The trails have natural obstacles such as drop-offs, rock tires and tree roots and trail obstacles such as step ups, bowl turns and skinnys. Some parts you have to walk.

4. Advanced: You ride at a medium to high speed over single trails, rock gardens and northshore. These trails with a difficulty level S3-S4 are narrow (30 cm) and unclear. The trails have natural obstacles such as large drop-offs and trail obstacles such as Gap Jumps, Roller Coasters and Log Rides. A super exposed trail is no problem for me; I stay calm, calm, keep both tires on the ground and drive down in a controlled manner.

5. Expert: You ride at a medium to high speed over single trails, rock gardens and northshore. These trails with a difficulty level S4-S5 are very narrow (15 cm) and unclear. The trails have natural obstacles such as big drops, loose rocks, logs and steep passages and trail obstacles such as Wallrides and Ladder Bridges. A super exposed trail is no problem for me; I stay calm, calm, keep both tires on the ground and drive down in a controlled manner.


descent condition

1. Rookie: You drive at a low speed on gravel paths, country roads, cart paths (double trails) and simple single trails. You have enough energy and concentration to make several short descents per day. You exercise an average of 2 hours a week.

2. Beginner: You drive at a low to medium speed on cart paths (double trails) and single trails. You have enough energy and concentration to make short to medium descents for several days in a row. You exercise on average 3 hours a week.

3. Intermediate: You ride at an average speed on single trails and rock gardens. You have enough energy and concentration to make medium descents for a whole day, or for half days in a row. You exercise an average of 4 hours a week.

4. Advanced: You ride at a medium to high speed over single trails, rock gardens and northshore. You have enough energy and concentration to make medium to long descents for several days in a row. You exercise on average 5 hours a week.

5. Expert: You ride at high speed over single trails, rock gardens and northshore. You have enough energy and concentration to make descents for several days to a week. You exercise on average 6 hours a week.


Ascent technique

1. Rookie: You make easy climbs on gravel paths, cart paths (double trails) and simple single trails. The trails are very wide (120 cm), clear and have no obstacles.

2. Beginner: You make easy climbs on cart paths (double trails) and single trails. The trails are wide (90 cm), well-arranged and have obstacles such as mud strips, streams or bridges.

3. Intermediate: You make climbs on single trails with steep sections. On some stretches you have to push or carry the bike. The trails are on average wide (60 cm), partly clear and have obstacles such as sections with small tree roots, rock tires and small steps.

4. Advanced: You make climbs on single trails with persistently steep sections. On some stretches you have to push or carry the bike. The trails are narrow (30 cm), unclear and have obstacles such as sections with large tree roots, rock tires and steps.

5. Expert: You make climbs on single trails with persistently steep sections. On some stretches you have to push or carry the bike. The trails are very narrow (15 cm), unclear and have obstacles such as sections with large tree roots, rock tires, loose stones and steps.


Ascent condition

1. Rookie: You are able to cycle at a slow pace for 2 hours or 15-25 km per day, but take several long breaks. Riding for several days sounds challenging, but you can handle 2 or 3 half-days with 2 hours of pedaling per half-day. You can handle one or two easy climbs. In total you climb 250-500 meters per day. These short climbs are on gravel paths, cart paths (double trails) and easy single trails. You exercise an average of 2 hours a week.

2. Beginner: You are able to cycle at an average pace for 3 hours or 25-45 km per day, but take several short breaks. Riding for several days sounds challenging, but you can handle 3 half-days with 3 hours of pedaling per half-day. You can handle two or three easy climbs. In total you climb 500-1000 vertical meters per day. These short climbs are on cart paths (double trails) and single trails. You exercise on average 3 hours a week.

3. Intermediate: You are able to cycle 4-5 hours or 45-65 km per day at an average pace, but take some long breaks. Multi-day trips are no problem. One of those days you can also pedal for 6 hours and/or make more altimeters. You can handle three or four steep climbs. In total you climb 1000-1500 altimeters per day. These medium climbs are on single trails. On some stretches you have to carry the bike. You exercise an average of 4 hours a week.

4. Advanced: You are able to cycle at an average pace for 5-6 hours or 65-85 km per day, but take some short breaks. Multi-day trips are no problem. One of those days you can also pedal for 7 hours and/or make more altimeters. You can tackle three or four climbs where it is persistently steep. In total you climb 1500-2000 altimeters per day. These long climbs are on single trails with tree roots and rocks. On some stretches you have to carry the bike. You exercise on average 5 hours a week.

5. Expert: You are able to cycle 6-7 hours or 85-100 km per day at a medium or high pace, but take some short breaks. Multi-day trips are no problem. One of those days you can also pedal for 8 hours and/or make more altitude meters. You can tackle more than four climbs where it is persistently steep. In total you climb 2000-2500 altimeters per day. These long climbs are on single trails with tree roots and rocks. On some stretches you have to carry the bike. You exercise on average 6 hours a week.


Knowledge

1. Rookie: You drive marked routes. You can maintain your bicycle yourself, but for repairs you go to the bicycle repair shop. You have knowledge of the basic skills such as position on the bike, shifting and braking.

2. Beginner: You drive existing routes and use an app on your phone or a bike computer. You can carry out simple repairs to your bicycle yourself, such as replacing an inner tube and repairing a broken chain. You have knowledge of the basic skills such as balance in the turn, pedal movement and frequency and reading the trail.

3. Intermediate: You drive existing routes and use an app on your phone or a bike computer. You can repair or replace parts of the brakes or drive yourself. You have knowledge of skills for driving technical downhill with obstacles and cornering at speed. You know the rules that apply to trails and in the bike park and you are familiar with the different levels. In the event of an accident, you can provide first aid and call emergency services.

4. Advanced: You drive existing routes and/or modify existing routes. You can replace parts such as bottom bracket, bearings and brake fluid yourself. You have knowledge of skills for riding a technical climb and taking tight turns and jumps. You know the rules that apply to trails and in the bike park and you are familiar with the different levels. In the event of an accident, you can provide first aid and call emergency services.

5. Expert: You can create completely new routes yourself and you can also navigate with a map and compass. Are you a bike maker? You can solve all problems yourself with the right tools. You have skills for driving steep descents, tight switchbacks and taking big jumps and gaps. You know the rules that apply to trails and in the bike park and you are familiar with the different levels. In the event of an accident, you can provide first aid and call emergency services.


A day on the road with a teacher or guide requires more energy and concentration than a day of skiing, boarding or biking. We challenge you and let not only the body but also the mind work hard. Boundaries are personal and that is why it is important that you know your limits and make them known to us. This way we can find the best route for you.

Do you have questions about our level classification?

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Reviews

Based on 162 reviews

A super few days!

Thanks to Jelle and Michiel, we had a great experience in St. Anton over the past few days. The group was well coordinated. A different location for a longer stay arranged by Michiel was great, highly recommended! Thanks for the flexibility! and arranging it! Our guide Jelle, is a winner! He knew how to get the most out of the participants and the day every time, with safety first. This boy really knows what he is talking about! What a technique and skill he has and what do we have Enjoyed it, will do it again next time! Thanks for a super few days! Hans

Hans Kaandorp

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